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CDC: Contact Lens Wearers are Taking Chances with Their Eyes

2015-08-21 14_26_32-find contact lenses - Google SearchNearly all of the 41 million Americans who use contact lenses admit they engage in at least one type of risky behavior that can lead to eye infections, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers reported Thursday.

“Good vision contributes to overall well-being and independence for people of all ages, so it’s important not to cut corners on healthy contact lens wear and care,” Dr. Jennifer Cope, a medical epidemiologist at the CDC, said in an agency news release. “We are finding that many wearers are unclear about how to properly wear and care for contact lenses,” Cope said.

Four-fifths admitted keeping their contact lens cases for longer than recommended, and more than half said they add new solution to the existing solution instead of emptying the contact lens case first. About half reported wearing their contact lenses while sleeping.

Each of these behaviors boosts the risk of eye infections by five times or more – CDC

Each of these behaviors boosts the risk of eye infections by five times or more, according to the CDC. The study was published in the Aug. 21 issue of the agency’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

The CDC outlined the following ways contact lens wearers can reduce their risk of eye infections:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water, and dry them before touching contact lenses.
  • Remove contacts before sleeping, showering or swimming.
  • Rub and rinse contacts in disinfecting solutions each time you remove them.
  • After each use, rub and rinse the contact lens case with solution, dry the case with a clean tissue and store it upside down with the caps off.
  • Don’t add fresh solution to old solution.
  • Replace contact lens cases at least once every three months, and carry a pair of backup glasses in case you have to remove your contact lenses.
 
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Posted by on August 21, 2015 in Tips

 

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Hundreds lose Vision Each Year to Fireworks in the USA

The 4th of July is tomorrow in the USA, and with it comes neighborhood and community fireworks displays.  Most of the people setting off fireworks have little to no training, and there are many injuries – including serious damage or destruction of the cornea.

 400 Americans lose vision in one or both eyes each year because of eye injuries caused by fireworks.

Some facts:

  • Approximately 8,500 Americans are treated in emergency rooms each year for fireworks-related injuries. Of these, it is estimated that 20 percent are eye injuries.
  • 4150420449_811289d8b9_zAs many as 400 Americans lose vision in one or both eyes each year because of eye injuries caused by fireworks.
  • Children, 16 years and younger, account for 60 percent of fireworks eye injuries in the United States.
  • 80 percent of fireworks injuries occur around the Fourth of July holiday, between June 29 and July 5.
  • More than 40 percent of injuries happen to bystanders.
  • By far, the most dangerous type of firework is the bottle rocket. The bottle rocket flies erratically, frequently injuring bystanders, and the bottle or cans used to launch them often explode, showering fragments of glass or metal in all directions.
  • Sparklers burn at 1,800 F (hot enough to melt gold) and cause third degree burns.
  • The typical victim is a male, ages 13-15, at home with a group of friends, no adults present. The typical firework is a bottle rocket, which leads to severe eye damage. The treatment is immediate surgical intervention; multiple follow-up surgeries. The probable outcome: permanent visual loss; frequently, loss of an eye.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology warns that fireworks related injuries are dangerous and provides these guidelines for fireworks

  • Never handle fireworks without protective eyewear and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type. If older children are permitted to handle fireworks, ensure they are closely supervised by an adult and wear protective eyewear.
  • Clear the area of flammable materials and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows.
  • Do not touch unexploded display (show) fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

If an eye injury occurs, don’t touch or rub it, as this may cause even more damage. Also, don’t flush the eye out with water or attempt to put any ointment on it. Instead, cut out the bottom of a paper cup, place it around the eye, and immediately seek medical attention!

 
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Posted by on July 3, 2013 in Tips

 

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Anime, Manga, Pop-Star Contact Lenses – A great way to damage your cornea

My daughter is totally into Anime and Manga characters, so I’m going to pass this through to my readers…  Please share this with those you know with tweens or teens.

Postscript:  Apparently these lenses are now making their way into the child pageant circuit.  Unbelievable!!!

FDA issues warning about decorative contact lenses

Silver Spring, MD – People who use decorative contact lenses as part of their Halloween costumes should consider risks such as an eye infection, cornea damage, vision loss and blindness, according to a consumer update released Oct. 12 by the Food and Drug Administration.

Classified as medical devices, decorative lenses must be specially designed and fitted to a patient’s eyes and are not “one size fits all,” according to FDA. The agency warns consumers to be wary of vendors that do not require a prescription or provide thorough instruction for the lenses.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H45GYPAuTdg]

FDA recommends the following for people wearing decorative lenses this Halloween season:

  • Schedule an appointment with a licensed eye doctor, who can properly measure your eyes and provide a valid prescription.
  • Follow up with a doctor if you experience redness, pain or a decrease in vision.
  • Practice proper usage and storage instructions.
  • FDA also warns consumers about anime-inspired lenses, which typically are larger than normal contact lenses and not FDA-approved.
 
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Posted by on October 22, 2011 in Interesting Stuff

 

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