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Category Archives: Little Things That are Better

3-D Movies after Corneal Transplant

With Keratoconus in my left eye, I had pseudo-3d vision.  My right eye was doing the lions share of sharp vision, while my left eye was trying hard to give a blurry depth to it all.  But for the most part, I was monocular.

When my wife, kids and I had popped in to a “Bug’s Life in 3D” movie at Disney around 10 years ago, I could not see the effects.  I had since looked at a 3d movie or two on TV and still, nothing.

GRAVITY

floating-in-gravity_original

But since my surgery, I’m fully binocular.  So my wife and I decided to go see “Gravity” in 3D last night.  You might say it’s the first 3D movie I’ve seen since, well, ever.  It was a lot of fun to wear the glasses and see the various objects spinning outside the screen.  The movie was pretty good (I got hung up on how Sandra Bullocks’ escape pod was pointing in the right direction when she fired the thrusters and other physics problems) and I enjoyed the evening with my wife.

I look forward to seeing the new Hobbit movie or other 3d movies soon.

 
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Posted by on October 21, 2013 in Little Things That are Better

 

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Little Things: Glasses after Corneal Transplant (That Work!)


oakley

A short post today.  With the sutures coming out slowly over time, it’s always been my choice to put off getting a new eyeglasses prescription.

With lenses being so expensive, and insurance limitations, it hardly made sense to pay for a new left lens every few months as my vision (astigmatism) was altered by the process.  I was already tweaking expensive contacts to follow the “suture roulette”, so I chose to hold off on the glasses.

Well, with all sutures out and a month of stabilization, I’ve finally got new lenses for my Oakley glasses.  It’s amazing to have spectacles that correct nearly as well as my contacts – and liberating.  I can now feel more confident on driving holidays where I might find myself at the wheel longer than my lens wear time allows.  And I can easily drive should a mid-night emergency happen.

Scott Clark

With allergies wreaking havoc on both eyes this Fall, I may choose to wear the glasses more often, allowing me to use eye drop antihistamines anytime I need them, avoiding the drowsiness that comes with their oral equivalent.

I cannot remember when I last had glasses that worked so well – but I’d guess it’s been nearly 15 years.

So, yet another little thing that the DALK surgery has brought me, more than two years later.

 

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Little things: PAN-STARRS comet viewing

It happens every 110,000 years.  And I saw it thanks to my improved vision.

pan-starrs

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2013 in Little Things That are Better

 

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Little Things: Autumn Colors in Kentucky

And without warning, seemingly overnight, Autumn has reached Kentucky.  Our trees now begin their show and we head into our relatively mild winters here.

With my new eyesight, I’ve enjoyed autumn this year more than usual.  I’ve spent days outside on weekends with my hobby and taken in every minute detail.

It’s so much more than sharpness – it’s color saturation that comes with the new eyes.

Blog Theme Update

It’s also been a long time since I’ve updated the blog’s look.  So I hope you like the new theme I’ve chosen moving us into the cooler months.

 
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Posted by on October 16, 2012 in Little Things That are Better

 

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Little Things: Stargazing

I just went on a 2 week family vacation to CA.  Lots of night driving.  Not a peep out of my contact lens, and never any pain at all and wore them for 14+ hours daily.   We went to Yosemite and at 5000 feet elevation, found a remote field and just went stargazing for a few hours with my kids.  Did you know that most kids never see a starry night?  It was the first time I’d done this since cornea transplant surgery – and it was wonderful.  I had my new soft lens in place and each star was a pinprick.  Meteors, satellites and more.   I imagined my donor out there somewhere.  I think we might join a stargazing group in Lexington.

 
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Posted by on July 23, 2012 in Little Things That are Better

 

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Little Things: A Robin Feeding Her Young

Today I watched a robin working her nest.  My depth perception was, well, deep.  With keratoconus, I would previously have been less able to pick out the nest against the leaves in the background.  But this time, it was clear.  The colors were distinct, and the ugly little birdlings were even more homely than I recall before.   Brilliant.

 
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Posted by on April 25, 2012 in Little Things That are Better

 

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New – DALK Transplant Chronology

Quick post to let you know that I just made a new page which covers the chronology from my first Dr. appt to one year after the surgery.  Same posts, but in chronological order.

http://corneanews.com/about-kerataconus/chronology/

 

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Little Things: Holiday Lights without Keratoconus Halos

Keratoconus distortion at night - goneMy latest observation about the little things that are different since my DALK corneal transplant surgery comes this holiday season.  This year, I’m seeing holiday lighting as it’s mean to be seen – with pinpoints of color.   Not only were they hard to see with Keratoconus, but I was unable to drive around at night to look.   If I close my right eye, I still get the slightest echoing of pinpoints, but with both eyes, my brain filters that out.  I think the blurring that remains is because I’ve no corrective lens yet on the left eye.

Coming up:  I will be halting steroids in a week or so.

 
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Posted by on December 23, 2011 in Little Things That are Better

 

Little Things #3: Ability To Really Get Back into Mountain Biking

Mountain biking in Kentucky is generally called “Cross Country” riding.  The terrain is made up of undulating hills usually 150-200 feet maximum.  A good 10 mile ride will take several hours and offers a tremendous upper and lower body workout.  It’s more like cross country skiing than downhill skiing for lack of a better example.  The reward for a long climb is usually a roller coaster ride through a tunnel of vegetation, airborne some of the time, making split-second decisions on how to manage what’s coming at you.  You’ll encounter wildlife and get away from the city in a very special way.

The wooded trails require depth perception.  Things come at you and you must make a decision, react and adjust your “line”  to overcome it.  Branches can be low, rocks can be loose, and alternative paths through difficult terrain can make the difference between a thrill and a spill.  It’s definitely possible to ride with one bad eye, but you must ride slowly and carefully or choose “open” trails like the fire-roads I rode in CA.   Kentucky has very limited trails compared to most states (go figure) and most are of the wooded variety, so this is great for me.

I’d say ride wherever and however you can, good eyes or not, and adjust your pace and path.  As my surgical eye gets better and better, I crossed a “binocular” threshold where I am comfortable on cross country wooded trails again.  When I stop in the woods to enjoy a babbling creek or to watch a white-tail deer , I’ll say “thank you” again for the priceless gift that my donor gave me.

<photo by trailsource.com used under CC license>

 

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Little Things #2: Ability to Use a Bike Mirror

After you have DALK/Corneal Transplant, you start to notice some of life’s little conveniences that were out of reach when your eye was messed up.

So… Little Things #2,  The ability to use a bike mirror…   as a bike commuter, these small glasses-mounted mirrors have always been great.  But with Keratoconus in my left eye, I’d not been able to use it.  Naturally, these only work on the left side (in the USA) as this is where the traffic is.

 

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